The Sub-Gents Return to Finish: ‘the Manchester Job’

I first set my jaded eyes & allegedly discerning ears upon the triumvirate that trade under the nomme de gare of: ’the Subterranean Gentleman’ (shortened to a curt but cute ‘Sub Gents’) about a year ago at Manchester’s ‘Rebellion’ venue,  and I opined then that their robust & rattling set had left the venue’s skeletal…

Twilight of the Mortals, BLUR-Magazine & the Analog/ Digital Dichotomy

As we await with tremulous hearts for ‘Twilight of the Mortals’ to thump thunderously onto our doormats, or elbow its way into some people’s expectant (real life) mail boxes, it now transpires that one of Mont’s powerful shots of Killing Joke’s mercurial and enigmatic leader Jaz Coleman, can now be seen gracing the cover of…

Kill the Colossi: ‘Fuck the Tax Man’

As austerity bites, so too do Kill The Colossi! Very few bands get it right first time of asking. Even those acknowledged masters of the pop idiom, the Stones & the Beatles, stumbled a little at the off, with both issuing pretty insipid and uninspired lead-off singles; that’s if we’re being completely honest. Bournemouth’s (the…

‘The Strange Case of Dr Terry & Mr Chimes’ by Terry Chimes : 7/10′

The two sterling stints served on the Clash’s drum stool by the titular Terry, or as Joe Strummer renamed him in the worthy and politicised mid-70’s: ‘Tory Crimes’, bookended the career of the Clash in some respects; that’s the Clash as a fully functioning & creatively sharp unit of course… His first stint was when…

Their Finest Hour: Paul Hanley – The Recording of ‘Hip Priest’ in Iceland

Paul Hanley is the stentorian timekeeping half of the Hanley Rhythm Collision, his bass playing brother Steve being the other. Steve is the four stringed ‘yin’ to Paul’s perfectly timed ‘yang’, and together their innate and ‘simpatico’, syncopated stylings have been a constant and consistent influence on the British independent music scene since 1979. Some…

* Their Finest Hour – Tom Hingley *

Originally posted on Rahman the Writer:
A word that’s oft-ascribed but very seldom deserved these days is: ‘legend’. In our ersatz and homogenised times, if you don’t consider Tom Hingley one, you probably have worryingly woeful taste in music, and so by extension you should move along, nothing to read here. Tom’s most famous and…

Penny at the Palace on Remembrance Sunday

Penny at The Palace on Remembrance Sunday This was the penultimate tête-à-tête at John Robb’s Louder Than War‘ Open Heart, Open Door’ three day event that was held in Manchester this weekend (11th-13th November). It was an ambitious event which was set within the opulent confines of the Palace Hotel which glitters with stained-glass, faience…

‘Singapore Triptych’ by Jose Martinez

Consider the ‘triptych’ for a meaningful moment. In strictly etymological terms it’s derived from the Greek meaning literally ‘three-fold’, and within the context of art history it has made occasional but by no means regular appearances; and as far as recent art history is concerned, the last high profile and notable triptych was by Francis…

The March of Modernism : Gamine Girls and Black Eyed Boys

In 1965 the modernists, principally but not exclusively of London, seemed to have found a way to directly access the grid of electricity that lit the jaundice- yellow street lights and powered the tube trains that bisected and thundered through its submerged veins. These gamine girls and wide-eyed boys were the new-moneyed denizens of the…